The Frontline MH

THE FRONTLINE

The Frontline project is a digital archive established to collect and empower the voices of health care professionals and associated key workers during the Covid-19 pandemic.

If you are a health care professional or associated key worker, we would love for you to contribute your voice to the digital archive through video, images, sound, words or artwork.

East of England Ambulance
South Cambridge, UK

Healthcare Professional
Cambridge, UK

Neonatal Care
Cambridge, UK

East of England Ambulance
South Cambridge, UK

Neonatal Care
Cambridge, UK

Senior Dental Officer
South East England, UK

“Team of nurses heading into the COVID-19 pod of the emergency department.”

Registered Nurse
Los Angeles County, US

“We want people to know that Social Care is on the frontline too. We support disabled people and we are a social enterprise. We’ve picked up vulnerable people in the community and are helping them by doing prescription and shopping trips too.”

Social Care Facility
Essex, UK

“My week of overnights in the COVID ICU was a tough one. We had more deaths than I’ve had in my entire intern year so far. But I was lucky to be working with incredible teammates – most of the residents I worked with had also volunteered to be in the COVID ICU. More than ever, I’m grateful for the nurses and respiratory therapists, who spend more time in the patients’ rooms than any of us.

In a moment of quiet, I drew our fellow who donned a hood reminiscent of a medieval knight in order to intubate a patient who’d deliriously removed his own breathing tube (some COVID patients have needed extreme doses of medicine to stay sedated on the ventilators). It struck me as surreal as I watched everything take place through blinds and a thick pane of glass.”

General Surgery Resident
Boston, MA

Healthcare Professional
Cambridge, UK

Strange Times

The phones are silent,
all appointments cancelled,
there are few letters to type,
fewer arrive.

No-one needs help,
we’re all in the same boat.
In a strange office
we await the backlog
when this is ‘over’
and we have to move back.

One day we’ll be able to order
paper and envelopes,
queue for a sandwich in the canteen,
patients won’t rather have heart disease
than catch COVID-19.

Assistant Medical Secretary
York, UK

“There was so many of them they became just bodies, not people, not someone’s loved one, just bodies in beds.

2 beds where there was usually 1, borrowed equipment from theatres and old equipment we hadn’t seen for a while.

We had to change our mindset, quality care out the window, keep them alive, give them a chance.

Staff from everywhere redeployed to help out, terrified but there.
Not the same as a skilled ITU nurse but better than nothing was the take on it.

We lost a few, difficult conversations on the phone as no visiting allowed, but we allow 1 visitor in for end of life. We explain the risks but of course they come in. Property is wrapped up and they’re told not to open it for 72 hours.

But now some are getting better, and they’re needs change and we’ve had to change. We need to rehab them so now need more space and communication is difficult and it must be so frightening for them.

I have boxes in my head where I put stuff, I worry for younger staff and staff who don’t have good support at home, that’s what keeps me going.

The team work is phenomenal and that makes me so proud that I’m part of this.”

Senior Sister Critical Care
Birmingham, UK

“My week of overnights in the COVID ICU was a tough one. We had more deaths than I’ve had in my entire intern year so far. But I was lucky to be working with incredible teammates – most of the residents I worked with had also volunteered to be in the COVID ICU. More than ever, I’m grateful for the nurses and respiratory therapists, who spend more time in the patients’ rooms than any of us.

In a moment of quiet, I drew our fellow who donned a hood reminiscent of a medieval knight in order to intubate a patient who’d deliriously removed his own breathing tube (some COVID patients have needed extreme doses of medicine to stay sedated on the ventilators). It struck me as surreal as I watched everything take place through blinds and a thick pane of glass.”

General Surgery Resident
Boston, MA

Each and every story in this unprecedented time is important and The Frontline project wants to protect individual experiences from getting lost in the ever-changing and often panic-driven media landscape.

We hope contributions to this project will result in an archive of shared histories that can be preserved for the future, establishing a vital and long-lasting voice for frontline workers which will be of cultural, political and historical significance.

         

The Frontline project is partly seed funded by prize money from the AHRC Research in Film Awards won by Prof. Topun Austin (Rosie, Cambridge University Hospitals Trust) , Sophie Jackson (Cambridge School of Creative Industries) & Dr Shreepali Patel (StoryLab) for The Golden Window, RIFA 2019 Best Research Film, Health and Wellbeing

JOIN THE CONVERSATION 

If you are a health care professional or associated key worker on the Covid-19 frontline, add #frontlinestories to your social media posts to share your voice.

Follow us on Twitter: @Frontline_ARU

This "post covid" period is actually tougher than the peak,when we were totally focused on managing the crisis.

Now #NHS staff & patients are chronically tired,economic hardship is biting,and we're dealing with the fallout of illness not dealt with during lockdown

#Covid_19

We are officially collecting audio clips for “Stories of a #Pandemic: Part 2.” How are you and your family? What’s it like caring for patients now? How are you weathering this? What do you hope for? Add your voice: http://thenocturnists.com/tell-your-story #MedTwitter #COVID19

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