Consultant Radiographer

Consultant Radiographer

from The Frontline

Shrewsbury and Telford, UK

We will have, of course, all had very personal and individual experiences of our journey through the Covid pandemic. And are still having. Overnight my role as a consultant radiographer changed. The list of GP’s and ED x-rays that need a report, gone. Plain clothes replaced with my old tunics, hoping that they still fit. Waiting rooms full of people awaiting an examination, gone. Replaced with donning and doffing PPE. Mask testing. Endless chest x-rays coupled with seemingly endless portables. Daily changes in policy and procedure. Suddenly becoming the font of all knowledge due to a position of information and covid meetings and planning. Almost excitement of the challenge ahead, suddenly replaced with worry and fear. Worries for patients, colleagues, myself, family, my husband. Fear of ‘what will this do to the world?’ I remember where I was when the Prime Minister announced lockdown, as many will I am sure, at work. Managing to get the TV on to see what was in store for us. We then sat there in some kind of stunned silence, the situation suddenly real.

PPE on. PPE off. PPE on. PPE off. Wash hands. Wash hands. Wash hands. Wash hands. Questions. More questions and even more questions. Frantically trying to find solutions. Who is going to work the night shift? That person can’t wear that mask, but can do that bit but can’t do that, trying to create a rota. A family member has developed symptoms, so does that mean they have to isolate. Constant. Keep going! What, something else has changed?

Who would have thought that this would have become second nature so quickly! However, good was to come from these experiences. Bonds with each other. Deeper bonds with friends, family and of course colleagues. Layers striped bare, human and raw. Finding solace in laughter and typical NHS humor and a strong united resolve to band together to get through this. Not being able to hug each other, difficult. Trying to smile with our eyes so patients can see our human selves through the masks. Holding desperately ill patients hands through gloves. Anger! Public portrayal of the NHS. I am a RADIOGRAPHER. Every patient sees me, not just doctors and nurses. So many emotions. Tears and laughter.

I am proud to be part of such an organisation, that no matter what, we strive forward. With a smile on our faces that you can no longer see. Keeping each other strong to care the best we can for our patients.

We will have, of course, all had very personal and individual experiences of our journey through the Covid pandemic. And are still having. Overnight my role as a consultant radiographer changed. The list of GP’s and ED x-rays that need a report, gone. Plain clothes replaced with my old tunics, hoping that they still fit. Waiting rooms full of people awaiting an examination, gone. Replaced with donning and doffing PPE. Mask testing. Endless chest x-rays coupled with seemingly endless portables. Daily changes in policy and procedure. Suddenly becoming the font of all knowledge due to a position of information and covid meetings and planning. Almost excitement of the challenge ahead, suddenly replaced with worry and fear. Worries for patients, colleagues, myself, family, my husband. Fear of ‘what will this do to the world?’ I remember where I was when the Prime Minister announced lockdown, as many will I am sure, at work. Managing to get the TV on to see what was in store for us. We then sat there in some kind of stunned silence, the situation suddenly real.

PPE on. PPE off. PPE on. PPE off. Wash hands. Wash hands. Wash hands. Wash hands. Questions. More questions and even more questions. Frantically trying to find solutions. Who is going to work the night shift? That person can’t wear that mask, but can do that bit but can’t do that, trying to create a rota. A family member has developed symptoms, so does that mean they have to isolate. Constant. Keep going! What, something else has changed?

Who would have thought that this would have become second nature so quickly! However, good was to come from these experiences. Bonds with each other. Deeper bonds with friends, family and of course colleagues. Layers striped bare, human and raw. Finding solace in laughter and typical NHS humor and a strong united resolve to band together to get through this. Not being able to hug each other, difficult. Trying to smile with our eyes so patients can see our human selves through the masks. Holding desperately ill patients hands through gloves. Anger! Public portrayal of the NHS. I am a RADIOGRAPHER. Every patient sees me, not just doctors and nurses. So many emotions. Tears and laughter.

A friend has drawn and interpreted my feelings through this journey and I am sure he will masterfully create more artwork going forward.  I am proud to be part of such an organisation, that no matter what, we strive forward. With a smile on our faces that you can no longer see. Keeping each other strong to care the best we can for our patients.

CONTRIBUTE YOUR STORY